Photosynthesis VIII

PHOTOSYNTHESIS VIII
Photographs by
June 13, 2013-July 10, 2013
A COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE BOSTON ARTS ACADEMY AND
WINCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL
Opening reception June 13, 2013 7 PM
Members gallery talk John Tunney, 6:15 PM
Gallery talk by Heidi Kirk Patrick at 6:45 PM.

Tuyen-Nguyen BAA

Tuyen-Nguyen BAA

Matt Grelotti Winchester HS

Matt Grelotti Winchester HS

Tuyen-Nguyen BAA thumbnail
Matt Grelotti Winchester HS thumbnail

By creating photographic portraits of themselves and their surroundings, students from the Boston Arts Academy and Winchester High School have been exploring their sense of self and place in a unique collaborative program at the Griffin Museum.

In its eighth year, the 5-month program connects approximately 40 students – 20 from each school – with each other and with professional photographers. The goal is to increase students’ awareness of the art of photography, as well as how being from different programs and different schools affects their approach to the same project.

The students were given the task of creating a body of work that communicates a sense of self and place. They were encouraged to explore the importance of props, the environment, facial expression, metaphor, and body language in portrait photography.

During the course of the project, students met with Mary Beth Meehan, a photographer and native of Rhode Island. Meehan’s City of Champions document the city of Brockton and the people who live there. Chelsea native Dominic Chavez talked with students about his work as a Boston Globe photographer and photographing in Africa and Afghanistan.

Students also met with Sam Sweezy, a professional fine art and commercial photographer and educator who lives in Arlington, MA. He has exhibited at major photography venues including the George Eastman House in Rochester, NY.

Alison Nordstrom, curator of the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., and Sweezy gathered with students for a group discussion of the work and a final edit of the exhibition.

“In collaboration and through creative discourse these students have grown,” said Paula Tognarelli, executive director of the Griffin Museum. “We are very pleased to be able to share this year’s students’ work. We thank the mentors for providing a very meaningful experience for the students. We also want to thank the Griffin Foundation and the Murphy Foundation, whose continued commitment to this project made learning possible. To paraphrase Elliot Eisner, the arts enabled these students to have an experience that they could have from no other source.”